Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Description

Product Description

In this major work of popular history and scholarship, acclaimed historian and biographer Roy Morris, Jr., tells the extraordinary story of how, in America''s centennial year, the presidency was stolen, the Civil War was almost reignited, and black Americans were consigned to nearly ninety years of legalized segregation in the South. The bitter 1876 contest between Ohio Republican governor Rutherford B. Hayes and New York Democratic governor Samuel J. Tilden is the most sensational, ethically sordid, and legally questionable presidential election in American history. The first since Lincoln''s in 1860 in which the Democrats had a real chance of recapturing the White House, the election was in some ways the last battle of the Civil War, as the two parties fought to preserve or overturn what had been decided by armies just eleven years earlier. Riding a wave of popular revulsion at the numerous scandals of the Grant administration and a sluggish economy, Tilden received some 260,000 more votes than his opponent. But contested returns in Florida, Louisiana, and South Carolina ultimately led to Hayes''s being declared the winner by a specially created, Republican-dominated Electoral Commission after four tense months of political intrigue and threats of violence. President Grant took the threats seriously: he ordered armed federal troops into the streets of Washington to keep the peace. Morris brings to life all the colorful personalities and high drama of this most remarkable -- and largely forgotten -- election. He presents vivid portraits of the bachelor lawyer Tilden, a wealthy New York sophisticate whose passion for clean government propelled him to the very brink of the presidency, and of Hayes, a family man whose midwestern simplicity masked a cunning political mind. We travel to Philadelphia, where the Centennial Exhibition celebrated America''s industrial might and democratic ideals, and to the nation''s heartland, where Republicans waged a cynical but effective "bloody shirt" campaign to tar the Demo-crats, once again, as the party of disunion and rebellion. Morris dramatically recreates the suspenseful events of election night, when both candidates went to bed believing Tilden had won, and a one-legged former Union army general, "Devil Dan" Sickles, stumped into Republican headquarters and hastily improvised a devious plan to subvert the election in the three disputed southern states. We watch Hayes outmaneuver the curiously passive Tilden and his supporters in the days following the election, and witness the late-night backroom maneuvering of party leaders in the nation''s capital, where democracy itself was ultimately subverted and the will of the people thwarted. Fraud of the Century presents compelling evidence that fraud by Republican vote-counters in the three southern states, and especially in Louisiana, robbed Tilden of the presidency. It is at once a masterful example of political reporting and an absorbing read.

Amazon.com Review

Stop me if you''ve heard this one: election night comes and goes and the race between two American presidential candidates is too close to call. The popular vote supports the reticent Democrat, but the well-connected Republican is named president after a lengthy and controversial fight over recounts and electoral votes. Of course, we''re speaking of the 1876 contest between Rutherford B. Hayes and Samuel Tilden as chronicled in Fraud of the Century by historian Roy Morris Jr. Morris spends much of the book setting the stage by illuminating the characters of both the folksy Hayes from Ohio and the urbane New Yorker Tilden. Though quite different, both men are presented as principled and, ironically enough, committed to wiping out corruption and chicanery. This helps the reader understand the players when the post-election mayhem ensues. The Electoral College is unable to declare a winner after Louisiana, South Carolina, and Florida submit multiple "official" ballots with different victorious candidates. Numerous shady deals are worked out to Hayes''s favor while forces loyal to Tilden threaten to march on Washington and install their man by force, if necessary. The most damaging result of the mess, according to Morris, is the pervasive mood of distrust and acrimony on the part of Congress, a mood that would contribute to the South''s notorious Jim Crow laws. History buffs will appreciate Morris''s extensive research but everyone enjoys a good political thriller. --John Moe

From Publishers Weekly

For those who think the election of George W. Bush over Al Gore in 2000 represented the nadir of American electoral politics, Morris (The Better Angel: Walt Whitman in the Civil War) provides some muchneeded historical perspective. In 1876, New York Democrat Samuel Tilden almost certainly won the popular vote over Ohio Republican Rutherford B. Hayes. But contested returns in Florida, Louisiana and South Carolina, as well as a legal issue in Oregon, eventually led to a 15-member congressional commission awarding Hayes all 20 contested electoral votes, giving him an improbable one-vote victory in the Electoral College. Well researched and written in clear prose, Morris''s account details the stunning sequence of political dirty tricks-including overturning Tilden''s nearly 8,000-vote lead in Louisiana-as well as the personalities that conspired to steal the election from Tilden. Although he maintains the decency of both candidates, Morris revives the political legacy of Tilden, portrayed here as a courageous and principled politician who stood up to the corruption of New York''s Tammany Hall. Tilden chose to concede the election rather than drag the nation down a dangerous path. "It was an act of supreme patriotism," Morris concludes, "for a man who had won, if not the presidency, at least the election." In sharp contrast to the contested election of 2000, dominated by hanging chads and confusing ballots, Morris''s account of the 1876 election reminds us that character can triumph over politics.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Morris, a biographer of several late-19th-century Americans, here examines the highly contested election of 1876--Tilden won more votes, but some questionable returns put Hayes in office.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

With partisans still claiming that George W. Bush stole the presidential election of 2000, it is pertinent to look back more than a century to another election that may have been hijacked. The election of Republican Rutherford B. Hayes over Democrat Samuel B. Tilden was a sordid affair in which graft, blatantly undemocratic procedures, and racial politics ruled the day. Morris, a former political correspondent and the author of several books on the Civil War, tells the story with a mixture of verve, cynicism, and outrage. New York governor Tilden had a reputation as a reformer, but the southern wing of his party included both recalcitrant rebels and hard-line racists. Hayes encouraged Northerners to "vote as you fought," further inflaming sectional passions. Although Tilden won the popular vote decisively, massive fraud in Florida, Louisiana, and South Carolina denied both men a majority in the Electoral College. Eventually, a special Electoral Commission anointed Hayes, guaranteeing the removal of federal troops from the South and ushering in the Jim Crow era. A well-researched, well-told account of a sorry chapter in our political history. Jay Freeman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

"An excellent book--thoughtful and well researched. It may be the last word on America''s most embarrassing election." -- Washington Times, 2/23/03

"Bravely nonconformist and greatly entertaining." -- WALL STREET JOURNAL, 2/4/03

"Fascinating...The details are entrancing...No one has told the story better than Roy Morris...A first-rate account." -- Henry F. Graff, THE NEW LEADER

"Highly readable, thoughtful and well documented." -- Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 2/23/03

"One of the nation''s darkest chapters, brilliantly exhumed and analyzed with due attention to its obvious contemporary relevance." -- KIRKUS REVIEWS (starred)

"This highly detailed, first-rate work of history reads more like a whodunnit than a historical examination." -- LIBRARY JOURNAL (starred)

"[A] historical account given in gorgeous detail that is hard to stop reading. Morris is a splendid historian and writer." -- SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, 2/9/03

Jeffry D. Wert author of Gettysburg, Day Three Fraud of the Century is a riveting and timely account of the 1876 presidential election. Roy Morris, Jr., reminds us of history''s long reach and of how contemporary events rarely are novel and unprecedented. Morris''s book is a fine read and a compelling story. -- Review

About the Author

Roy Morris, Jr., is the author of The Better Angel: Walt Whitman in the Civil War; Ambrose Bierce: Alone in Bad Company; and Sheridan: The Life and Wars of General Phil Sheridan. A former political correspondent, he lives in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.3 out of 54.3 out of 5
106 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Sauropod
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beware the Kindle edition
Reviewed in the United States on September 6, 2020
From what I read of it, the book seems engaging and lively. Unfortunately, the Kindle edition suffers from a fatal formatting problem. While the Introduction and Prologue are correctly formatted, all subsequent chapters are formatted with centered text. In other words, the... See more
From what I read of it, the book seems engaging and lively. Unfortunately, the Kindle edition suffers from a fatal formatting problem. While the Introduction and Prologue are correctly formatted, all subsequent chapters are formatted with centered text. In other words, the paragraphs are aligned with the center of the page, not the left-hand side, as is normal. I found the centered text impossible to read, and am requesting a refund. I suggest ordering the print edition.
6 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
MJ
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Political Drama of the Century as Well
Reviewed in the United States on August 4, 2015
In 1876, America celebrated the centennial of its independence. It was also the year of the most hotly contested presidential election in the history of the United States up until that point, and probably ever since. Not again until 2000 would America''s anxiety about an... See more
In 1876, America celebrated the centennial of its independence. It was also the year of the most hotly contested presidential election in the history of the United States up until that point, and probably ever since. Not again until 2000 would America''s anxiety about an election outcome be so prolonged and uncertain.

Some reviews of Fraud of the Century have called the book lopsided. But reviews of virtually every book I have read on the subject of the 1876 election have made similar criticisms. The election is difficult to write about without some finding the perspective slanted one way or another. Personally, I found Fraud of the Century to be as balanced an account of this contentious topic as one can possibly write, including the account of the events leading up to the election, and the tension that followed as Democrats and Republicans vied to come out on top.

The drama of this hotly disputed election plays out against the backdrop of reconstruction, carpetbagging, the rise of violence in the South, implementation of Black Laws, and Grant''s insouciance about the pervasive corruption in which his administration was mired. The country, still very much divided following the Civil War, continued to fester through the proxies of political parties. In the end, Democrats ran roughshod over blacks; Republicans ran roughshod over Democrats, and both political parties felt self-righteous about their respective actions. It is history worth knowing and understanding, and this book succeeds in enlightening its readers on this subject.

For those who think that the book is biased, try reading some of the other accounts of the election of 1876 and find one about which the same criticism cannot be made. Roy Morris'' Fraud of the Century brings to life a political drama which gripped the country in an well written and entertaining account.
10 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Captain K
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Rigged Election Without Trump as the Main Character?
Reviewed in the United States on January 24, 2021
When I set out to read this account, several years after its publication, I had no idea how timely it would turn out to be. 1876 was the only time in modern American history when the validity of a presidential election was seriously cast into doubt (and the outcome tainted... See more
When I set out to read this account, several years after its publication, I had no idea how timely it would turn out to be. 1876 was the only time in modern American history when the validity of a presidential election was seriously cast into doubt (and the outcome tainted by charges of corruption) - that is, until 2020. Though a strong argument can be made that the election was "thrown," with dire consequences (the end of Reconstruction quickly led to the era of Jim Crow), it is less clear whether the opposing candidate could have accomplished much better. The book''s extreme detail has cost it one star in my personal rating system, but it''s nevertheless an important chronicle of a major event in American political history.
Helpful
Report
Kenneth Timmerman
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Too much fluff
Reviewed in the United States on February 17, 2020
When the gist of a book of history can be found in a single anecdote in the introduction, you know something is wrong - with the author, the subject, or both. If you are interested in the history of election fraud in America, read the introduction to this book and skip all... See more
When the gist of a book of history can be found in a single anecdote in the introduction, you know something is wrong - with the author, the subject, or both. If you are interested in the history of election fraud in America, read the introduction to this book and skip all the mind-numbing, irrelevant, and poorly-written character sketches of bit players who have no business in the history books.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Marc and Susan Osborne
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fascinating portrait of the United States a decade after the civil war
Reviewed in the United States on July 12, 2013
I was originally interested in this book because of the uncanny similarity between the election of 1876 and that of 2000: the Democratic candidate won the popular vote but the Republican candidate was declared the winner, amid allegations of election fraud. But that... See more
I was originally interested in this book because of the uncanny similarity between the election of 1876 and that of 2000: the Democratic candidate won the popular vote but the Republican candidate was declared the winner, amid allegations of election fraud. But that similarity is in important respects only superficial, and I disagree with those reviewers who conclude that Roy Morris Jr. wrote the book out of partisan support for Al Gore. The book is very interesting, but it sheds no light on the election of 2000, nor does it pretend to. Rather, it is a fascinating portrait of United States political culture at a particular moment, a moment very different from our own. The United States at that time was still working out the consequences of the civil war and had not yet gone through the era of big capitalism. As a result, very different social and economic concerns divided the country and the parties in 1876, so much so that it''s hard to see much continuity between the Republican and Democratic parties of 1876 and those or our own era. Even more striking is the very different level of political corruption that was accepted as normal at that time. Make no mistake, by today''s standards the election of 1876 was stolen, and stolen brazenly. There''s just no comparison between the outright fraud of 1876, depicted at length in Morris''s book, and the maneuvering of 2000. Importantly, Morris doesn''t appear (not to me, anyway) to believe that the Democrats were more morally upright than the Republicans in 1876, nor that they were seriously opposed in principle to what we would now consider political fraud. At best, the Republicans were more organized; most importantly, it happened that Republicans controlled the governments of the contested states.

In addition to his portrait of the times, Morris''s book is also a portrait of the individuals involved in the election. He paints a sympathetic portrait of the Republican candidate (and later President), Rutherford B. Hayes, noting that Hayes did not instigate the fraud and may not have been aware of its scope. Morris also examines the conventional notion,which I learned in high school, that the Democrats ultimately allowed Hayes to assume the presidency in return for a promise to end Reconstruction. Morris demonstrates that this understanding is overly simplistic. It''s not clear that Hayes gave any such promise, and Reconstruction was dying before he took office, mostly because northern Whites were tired of fighting for it.

Overall, Morris is a lively writer and brings to life a different time in United States history. I highly recommend his book, for reasons that have nothing to do with George Bush or Al Gore.
13 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
J. King
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The vote
Reviewed in the United States on July 29, 2013
Morris summarizes his thesis that by fraudulent means the republicans stole the presidential election—from Sam Tilden, democratic candidate—of 1876 to give the presidency to Rutherford (some: Rutherfraud) B. Hayes by the choice of 1 sole Supreme Court Judge. I am sure many... See more
Morris summarizes his thesis that by fraudulent means the republicans stole the presidential election—from Sam Tilden, democratic candidate—of 1876 to give the presidency to Rutherford (some: Rutherfraud) B. Hayes by the choice of 1 sole Supreme Court Judge. I am sure many conservatives are outraged by this conclusion. But you must read for yourself. I love U.S. history and Morris has a captivating way of writing about it.

Morris in his own words:

<blockquote>But even as Tilden was completing his royal progress and retiring for the night as the nation’s presumptive president-elect, an unlikely trio of supporting actors—a controversial former general, an openly pessimistic political operative, and a bitterly partisan journalist—was preparing to make its entrance onto the stage. And with the subsequent dispatching of a few well-chosen telegrams to Republican functionaries in a handful of questionable southern states, those three bit players— Daniel E. Sickles, William E. Chandler, and John C. Reid—would set into motion a chain of events that would effectively stall Samuel Tilden’s long-anticipated victory march and stifle the cheers in millions of Democratic throats. Over the course of the next few days Americans would come to realize—with conflicting emotions of anger, elation, and disbelief—that the presidential election of 1876, far from being over, in many ways had just begun.</blockquote>

Oh, one of the states whose votes were held in recount by republican reconstruction governments?

Florida.

Go figure!
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
dpc915
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Shoddy paperback
Reviewed in the United States on June 8, 2020
The writing Itself is excellent. The actual physical paperback is not....pages falling out and it’s brand new
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Michael Ariens
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A delight
Reviewed in the United States on February 9, 2020
An engaging and well researched study of the utterly contested presidential election of 1876, aptly known as the fraud of the century. Morris''s assessments are usually fair, though he is quite harsh on Ulysses Grant. The minor characters are fleshed out, and though losing... See more
An engaging and well researched study of the utterly contested presidential election of 1876, aptly known as the fraud of the century. Morris''s assessments are usually fair, though he is quite harsh on Ulysses Grant. The minor characters are fleshed out, and though losing nominee Samuel Tilden remains an enigma, Morris does excellent work in trying to understand him. Well worth the time.
Helpful
Report
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale

Fraud new arrival of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and online sale the Stolen Election of 1876 outlet online sale